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Why do some companies choose to end Christmas party traditions?

On Behalf of | Nov 1, 2021 | Work agreements and policies

People in all different industries have traditionally looked forward to their company Christmas parties every year. Often, these celebrations come with bonuses or presents from an employer. They often also involved everyone on staff wearing nice outfits and enjoying a meal and some drinks together.

Company Christmas parties can be a major perk of employment and can help enrich the culture at your business. They can be an opportunity to blow off steam for the workers and for owners and executives to share the revenue generated by a year of hard work.

Unfortunately, company Christmas parties have become increasingly rare in California and across the United States. Why have businesses started to phase out these holiday traditions?

Celebrating a religious holiday is not that inclusive

More Americans than ever before identify as non-religious, and adherents of non-Christian religions are increasingly comfortable speaking up about how the focus on Christmas makes them feel excluded from cultural conversations. Companies may choose to phase out Christmas parties to make their business more appealing to people from other religions or those with no particular faith.

There are better ways to engage in profit sharing

Throwing a party that costs thousands of dollars will diminish how much your budget goes to worker perks and bonuses. If you allowed your staff to vote about how to use the funds earmarked for the Christmas party, it is likely that many of them would rather receive a small bonus or a gift card instead of a meal at a potentially awkward social gathering. 

Holiday parties have an association with inappropriate conduct

After a supervisor enjoys a couple of drinks, they may say something completely inappropriate to one of their subordinates. One person inappropriately acting out on the dance floor could offend and embarrass dozens of their co-workers.

The misconduct of employees at holiday parties doesn’t just affect the person acting out but also morale across the entire company. Rather than cracking down on individual employees who over celebrate, businesses may choose instead to get rid of the temptation in the first place.

Re-evaluating your company’s employment practices, including perks like holiday parties, can help you minimize the risks that you have while operating the business.